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What are the chances of having a autistic child?

Discussion in 'General Autism Discussion' started by superboyian, Aug 17, 2010.

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  1. superboyian

    superboyian Super Nerd Staff Member Admin

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    I'm just curious because I made one thread on Wrongplanet about that and didn't really get too much responses due to so many popular and pretty much the same old threads, so I thought I ask the same question here.

    So yes, I'm a autistic indiviual and I have a girlfriend who has autism and we both decided we want to have a baby together and live as a happy family at least, but from what I heard, it sometimes comes in the genes and I wonder if I most likely would have a autistic child?
  2. petrossa

    petrossa Well-Known Member

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    You've answered the question yourself. The changes are larger then average based on mendels laws since the genetic component can be present in most forms of brain wiring anomalies.

    There is the difficult issue of gestational influences of maternal hormones/toxins on the foetus which is impossible to quantify. Having the gene (if it exists) doesn't mean it get's expressed for sure, but it 's likelier then not having the gene.

    No one can tell you with any measure of certainty of what your changes are, but both having it sure does raise the odds.
  3. petrossa

    petrossa Well-Known Member

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    this might interest you:
    The promise of new therapeutics is illustrated by progress in understanding the biology underlying Fragile X syndrome. The fragile X gene encodes a protein, FMR1, which functions in nerve terminals to hold a set of RNA molecules in a state where they are ready to be translated into protein when the synapse is active. The new proteins are needed when a synapse has to be strengthened after use (a core mechanism of learning). Another protein, a glutamate channel called mGluR1, performs the opposing function – when activated it signals for these mRNAs to be translated. If the FMR1 protein is mutated then the RNA molecules get translated too early. This effect can be counter-balanced by turning down the activity of the mGluR1 protein. Remarkably, this results in very significant amelioration of the “symptoms” of FMR1 deletion in a mouse model of Fragile X syndrome. These results are so impressive that drugs to block mGluR proteins are now in small-scale clinical trials of human Fragile X patients.

    This example illustrates how discovery of the responsible gene and elucidation of its functions at a molecular level can suggest highly specific ways to correct or compensate for the effect of the mutation, specifically in those patients with that lesion. We can expect this kind of approach to be similarly successful in discriminating patients with other disorders such as schizophrenia or epilepsy into genetically distinct subgroups. This promises to radically transform how patients with these diverse symptoms are diagnosed and treated – no longer lumped together into categories of questionable validity and usefulness, but based on their individual genetic profile.

    http://wiringthebrain.blogspot.com/2010/08/defining-developmental-disorders.html
  4. Geordie

    Geordie Geordie V.I.P Member

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    No matter what, although there will be a high chance of having an ASD child if you and your partner are both ASDs, there is also a slight posisbility that your child may not have ASD at all. :)

    Such is the beauty of simple probabiliy. As long as the rate for autistics having autistic children is not 100%, the child may not be autistic at all with an autistic parent. But one thing for sure, he or she might have the autistic genes that might inherit autism.
  5. KinksFan

    KinksFan Well-Known Member

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    Whether my child turned out to be on the spectrum, or not I'd still love them, the same. I'm not a perfectionist.
  6. Geordie

    Geordie Geordie V.I.P Member

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    So do I --- I will accept my child no matter who he or she is.
  7. PanPaniscus

    PanPaniscus Former Moderator V.I.P Member

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    It's not 100% certain but there's more of a chance of having an autie child when the parents are than if the parents aren't.
    If the child is NT, they will more than likely be a carrier of the autistic genes but they just aren't activated, which I think would probably explain why autie children are born into NT familes, one or both of the parents could have carried the genes.
  8. mikkyh

    mikkyh Well-Known Member

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    Not sure in your particular case...but the chance of having an autistic child worldwide is about 5%.
  9. Geordie

    Geordie Geordie V.I.P Member

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    For us, it will be definitely higher than 5%.
  10. 142857

    142857 Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    Pretty high based on my experience. 2 out of 4 kids in my family definitely on the spectrum, and possible 3. My mother was likely a carrier (history in her family) and my father showed a lot of traits of AS (but also traits of schizophrenia, bipolar and psychosis). None of my siblings had children. I have two and one is an aspie.
  11. Tigris

    Tigris Well-Known Member

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    There are cases where Neurotypical families who dun have any Aspie relatives, suddenly have a child who is autistic.
  12. epath13

    epath13 the Fool.The Magician.The... V.I.P Member

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    I have an Autistic child. I do believe there's a pretty good chance your future child might have Autism. But again, there's no guarantee...but it would be kinda weird to have an NT kid in an Autistic family :) anyway you know from personal experience (from your childhood) it's going to be challenging to bring up an Autistic kid but you've turned out to be OK so there's a good chance your kid might be OK as well.
  13. Geordie

    Geordie Geordie V.I.P Member

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    Autism can happen everywhere - but for those with Autism, well, even higher chances of autism, I suppose
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