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I'm kind of nervous, joining the Defence Force

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Momo, Jul 17, 2017 at 1:33 AM.

  1. Momo

    Momo Active Larrikin

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    Well, I just got off my call with the Defence Force and will be sitting my test in a few weeks on August 9th. I honestly don't know how my test will go or if this is even the right decision, but at the moment it seems to be the only way I can and want to do (if I get in as an officer that is). And honestly, if I want to be able to support my family at all at my age it's going to be the only way I can.

    Do you have any opinions of this? Has anybody else been in the military? (In my case I'm referring to the Aussie Defence Force, I've heard the American is very different) And if so, how did that work out for you? I hope to get in as a legal officer. Thanks as always for your input.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2017 at 2:36 AM
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  2. thom&bonnie

    thom&bonnie A Boy and his Dog.

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    This is a very interesting subject and I am sure that I will eventually get around to posting a similar topic in future Momo.

    I can not get too deeply into details here as it is 0240 (AM) here in "The States", and I have other things that must be done before sunrise (when I feel guilty enough about staying up all night, every night, and climb into bed for my requisite four hours of sleep), but I enlisted for four years in the US Navy when I was 19yo and, despite the fact that I was discharged a year early for questioning the logic of "superiors", it was one of the greatest educational experiences of my life on many fronts. Despite the fact that I was totally unaware of my autism at the time, I learned socially adaptive skills during my three years in the military that could not have been duplicated anywhere else. As well, I was able (well... forced) to test myself against myself in regards to my own courage, perseverance, integrity, intelligence, sincerity, endurance, etc.

    Although I do not and would not today encourage anyone to voluntarily support any of the oligarchy's military efforts anywhere, the preceeding was my experience. I hope that you find my words of some use.
     
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  3. Momo

    Momo Active Larrikin

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    Thank you, that does help a bit. And though I don't support violent military action, the Australian military is actually used for majority humanitarian work and cleaning up after America these days. As with historical war being bad for Australia (such as Gallipoli), we now tend to stay out of conflict and simply clean up the mess. So, not something I consider to be too bad.
     
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  4. Streetwise

    Streetwise Well-Known Member

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    is being a soldier your vocation i tried to get into one the UK forces DONT want to say which one but i DONT like violence i think maybe one of my health problems gave a sign i WOULDNT be able to do it
     
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  5. Momo

    Momo Active Larrikin

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    I suppose I would be considered in good physical shape and am not a pacifist by any means. But I hope to get into the support section of the Australian military, which is the largest section and requires the most staff. I do not intend to be a ground trooper, and if I did not get in as a lawyer, I would apply for a different position of similar standing. If none of that works out then I might have to rethink my options.
     
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  6. thom&bonnie

    thom&bonnie A Boy and his Dog.

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    Agreed, cleaning up after America's messes (read atrocities) is a big job that will likely take decades (if America, the UK, Israel and the EU can be stopped). Kudos to you for wanting to help.
     
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  7. Streetwise

    Streetwise Well-Known Member

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    would you want to be a solicitor /barrister or just one of them
    my mam was really stressed being a solicitor in the UK
    being a barrister meant not doing the grunt work, the suicide rates are lower for barristers,
    does the adf pay to train you as a lawyer
     
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  8. Momo

    Momo Active Larrikin

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    Yes they do, and an engineer and so on, they also pay for your training so long as you serve for a certain amount of time. As said the biggest part of the Australian military is support and cleaning up America's messes, and you need lawyers for that ;)
     
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  9. OlLiE

    OlLiE Active Member

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    if you like organisation, clear structure and rules, clearly defined hierarchical relationships between people then i guess it could be good,

    if you have problems doing as you are told, and having people think for you when it comes to your timing, planning, the set approach to things, etc, i would maybe think again

    if you have problems doing things in a way that does not correspond to logical thinking, i would think again

    i would also assume that in the armed services everything is standardised for efficiency, that you are regularly being evaluated and that you always have to meet targets and norms

    would living on a base, in a barracks be for you?

    i assume that irrespective of what you want to do, you would have to go through bootcamp, where you most likely have to do group missions where everyone has to trust each other
     
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  10. wight

    wight Active Member

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    I spent 21 years in the US military and though I don't regret that; it did me no favors in the long term. When people here ask me whether they should join, this is what I tell them:
    1) If you have no other viable options, then yes.
    2) Serve 1 term, however long that is (enlisted are typically 4-6 years, officers 7-10) and get out.
    3) While you are are there, take advantage of every opportunity that will provide you training, experience and credentials in the real world.
    4) Stay in tune with the non-military economy and job market, it shifts much faster than military culture, don't expect it to be the same when you get out as when you went in.

    Admittedly, I am not an object voice, so grains of salt may be needed.
     
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  11. thom&bonnie

    thom&bonnie A Boy and his Dog.

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    Indeed.
     
  12. thom&bonnie

    thom&bonnie A Boy and his Dog.

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    Your first, second and third points are right on the mark. People that knew me well (or even briefly) before and after my "service" are quite rightly amazed that I actually lasted three years into my four year commitment. It was indeed my familiarity with and treating of authority as equals, my constant questioning, impugning and oppugning of their logic, thinking for myself and successfully completing spec. ops by doing it neither the right way, the wrong way nor the Navy Way, but my way that eventually lead to my 30 day, all-accommodations-paid vacation in Quantico Marine Brig and my choice of courts martial ("We will invent a charge", whispered the attorney from Naval Affairs) or immediately signed OTH discharge from the US Navy Special Forces.

    I would never encourage anyone to add their body and mind to the ranks of the oligarchy's fist, but for me it was a profound educational experience that has since proved invaluable in a manner that they might well view as... less-than-helpful to their cause.
     
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  13. Sportster

    Sportster Aged to Perfection

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    Sound wisdom! I did a three-year hitch in the US Army. What I learned has NOT helped me in civilian life. Had someone outlined career opportunities, I would have made a wiser choice that would have translated better in the civilian sector. Also, if I could turn the clock back, I probably would have gone in the Air Force since they offer better schooling and advancement opportunities based on one's abilities. However, none of that may be applicable to a foreign military option.

    I think the key thing is if someone is mature enough for military service. I've seen too many young people join based on what they've seen in movies or on video games and once they're in reality sets in. I knew what to expect since both of my parents had served.
     
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  14. Alaska

    Alaska Active Member

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    There are 3 reasons why what I have to say about the military might be any use to you. Being from the US might mean none of it applies.
    1) I was a nosy military brat and I eavesdropped a lot.
    2) I worked for the government with active and ex military.
    3) I often pay attention to what is happening in the world and like to read news from the countries where events are happening.

    Being in the military is a pretty secure job and it includes necessities like food and a place to stay. You can get totally squashed if you stick out too much. It mostly does not make good sense, of the "hurry up and wait" and "SNAFU" (Situation Normal All F***ed Up) variety.

    It can get you a good education that may or may not be any use in the real world. It can get you helpful contacts.

    You can learn coping skills not otherwise available.

    If you do not fit in you can be turned into a non-functional wreck for the rest of your life.

    You can get the satisfaction of serving your country and the rest of the world (maybe).

    You may receive respect and gratitude occasionally from others for the above service.
     
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