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Best And Worst Jobs For Aspergers Adults

Discussion in 'Autism Spectrum News, Events and Research' started by Pedro, Aug 18, 2011.

  1. Pedro

    Pedro Well-Known Member

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    Source/Original article: My Aspergers Child: Best and Worst Jobs for Aspergers Adults
     
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  2. Geordie

    Geordie Geordie

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    I know at least a couple of Aspies doing accounting work. Kudos to them...
     
  3. jonathan

    jonathan Well-Known Member

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    Isn't this a re-write of Temple Grandin's article on jobs for people with A.S.D's?

    Though I can agree with stocking shelves, it's what I do for a living right now and assuming you get along fairly well with your boss it's an awesome job. On top of that you're also isolated from social interaction for periods of time, which I think is when and where we perform our best. Granted it doesn't pay as much as the careers listed but at least it's something.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2011
  4. Geordie

    Geordie Geordie

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    At least, stacking shelves is a job.
     
  5. epath13

    epath13 the Fool.The Magician.The... V.I.P Member

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    "? Receptionist and telephone operator -- Would have problems when the switch board got busy"

    I might disagree with this one. It is probably true for lots of people on the spectrum but it wasn't for me. I worked (temporarily) as a receptionist and also had another job on the phone. I loved it when it was busy. I didn't have to wait. I didn't notice how the time flew by. But I actually quit one of those jobs because I couldn't stand waiting for a phone call. I would, sort of, get into a conversation mode and breaks between phone calls switched me off. When somebody called I needed a few minutes to readjust. Of course I didn't have a few minutes... so it was very stressful. The weird part is - I think, if I had to meet those people face to face instead of talking to them on the phone I wouldn't mind waiting :) have no clue why...
     
  6. Occasional_Demon

    Occasional_Demon Well-Known Member

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    That article was okay, but I don't know what demographic the author had in mind. I guess I actually found the article dispiriting because a lot of the jobs are fairly low-income, non-professional work. Almost like, you have ASD, therefore you should lower your sights because that's all you're good for. It seemed constricting, or perhaps I have read too much into the article's suggestions.
     
  7. Pedro

    Pedro Well-Known Member

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    I don't know.
     
  8. Pedro

    Pedro Well-Known Member

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    I have the exact same objections.
     
  9. Pedro

    Pedro Well-Known Member

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    I'm a futures market trader.
     
  10. Spinning Compass

    Spinning Compass Well-Known Member V.I.P Member

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    My job, before my duties changed, was NOT a good job for an Aspy. It pushed all my buttons. It was fast-paced stressful, requiring juggling of multiple deadlines and projects, some simple and quickly done and others complex and time-consuming. It did not matter if you were in the middle of a project that called for intense focus, you had to be able to switch gears at the drop of a hat. And yet, I survived one major and two minor layoffs and I am still there.

    On the other hand, it was a very good job for an Aspy, because it required attention to detail and ability to focus on what some people would call repetitive, boring tasks (data entry). So go figure. I don't think you can pigeon-hole people and jobs. Also, we tend to underestimate our ability to adapt when necessary. If I had stuck to Aspy-friendly jobs, I might not have been challenged to grow as much as I have.
     
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